Tag Archives: Sunpower

SunPower Solar Power Systems Planned for Four Escondido Union High School District Schools

Escondido Union High School District (EUHSD) and SunPower Corp. today announced a power purchase agreement (PPA) under which SunPower will build two megawatts of solar power systems at four district schools. The district estimates that the agreement will offset approximately 75 percent of its annual electricity demand, and save $13.4 million in electricity costs over the next 20 years.

Requiring no upfront capital investment on behalf of the district, the PPA provides EUHSD with competitive electricity rates and a hedge against potential utility rate increases.

“As a result of this agreement with SunPower, Escondido Union High School District will significantly reduce our energy costs, enabling us to apply the savings where they are needed, such as for enhanced academic programs or facility upgrades,” said EUHSD Assistant Superintendent of Business Services. “SunPower’s deep experience working with school districts is as important as the long-term performance of its technology. We are proud to support the development of additional solar power resources in our community.”

Read full press release from SunPower

Related Article: Local schools save with solar panels, batteries (San Diego Union-Tribune) − Dec. 16, 2015

Local schools save with solar panels, batteries

By Pat Maio, The San Diego Union-Tribune

With power rates skyrocketing for San Diego County school districts, Escondido’s has become the latest to agree to a power purchase agreement with a Silicon Valley-based solar company. The deal could help bring $9.8 million in savings over the next 20 years, a district official said.

Escondido Union High School District has dodged some of the larger power bills hitting school districts in San Diego County because of past initiatives to replace old heating and air-conditioning units, and replace light fixtures with more-efficient ones, said Michael Simonson, associate superintendent of business services with the Escondido school district. Over the past two school years, for instance, the Escondido school district has cut its demand for power by 958,000 kilowatt hours.

Meanwhile, its power bill from San Diego Gas & Electric Co. has risen by about $195,000, or 13 percent, from $1.43 million in the 2013-14 school year to $1.62 million, this past year. “The increased costs paid to utilities are dollars that we can’t spend on the classroom,” Simonson said. “We are trying to put that destiny in our hands and balance out some of those potential rate increases. When you look at what is in front of us, this is a good start for the next 20 years.”

San Jose-based SunPower Corp. hopes to begin construction of the solar panels by next summer at Del Lago Academy, and Orange Glen, San Pasqual and Escondido high schools. The panels will be situated atop carports planned for the student parking lots, and will provide shade during the day, and protection from rainy weather. The carports will be wide enough to shade two rows of cars.

The solar panels are just one part of the Escondido district’s energy-conservation plans. Tesla Motors Inc. also has a deal in place to build stationary battery storage systems for three of the Escondido school district’s high schools — a project that officials hope could save hundreds of thousands of dollars annually in electricity costs.

Read full article in the San Diego Union-Tribune

SunPower Plans to Sell Rooftop Solar Electricity in California

By Mark Chediak, Bloomberg Business

SunPower Corp., the second-biggest U.S. solar manufacturer, is developing a plan to sell electricity in California.

As the company combines its rooftop solar, energy storage and management systems, it will tap those resources to sell into the California bulk-power marketplace, Chief Executive Officer Tom Werner said in an interview Tuesday at the Edison Electric Institute Financial Conference in Hollywood, Florida.

“Participating in the wholesale markets is definitely where we will go,” Werner said. The company will initially focus on selling batteries along with its solar systems for backup power and reduction of power use during peak demand hours. “Walk before you run,” he said.

The move would represent a shift for SunPower, which has focused on making panels and developing solar farms. It comes after the California Independent System Operator Corp. approved in July rules that would allow aggregated distributed energy resources such as rooftop solar and batteries to participate for the first time in the state’s wholesale power market.

Read full article from Bloomberg Business

California-Mexico Partnership Addresses Climate Change

A recent trade mission between California and Mexico has helped strengthen partnership efforts to accelerate clean energy investment and combat climate change at the regional level. Leaders from the California Energy Commission, Stanford University, the University of California, and California businesses met with the Mexican Ministry of Energy and key representatives from the nation’s energy sector, governmental agencies, academic institutions and non-governmental organizations.

During the visit, there was an announcement of the intent to reach an agreement between SunPower, a global leader in solar technology solutions headquartered in California, and the Innovation and Technology Transfer Institute of Nuevo Leon to promote innovation in solar energy deployment and performance in Mexico. This collaboration would include Stanford University and the Technological Institute of Monterrey (ITESM) to establish a California-Mexico co-innovation program on solar energy and its large-scale integration to the Mexican grid. The program aims to develop local capacity on applied research and development in solar energy, while fostering entrepreneurial activities at ITESM.

This California delegation builds on momentum from the 2014 agreement signed by California Governor Edmund G. Brown Jr. and Mexican Secretary of Energy, Pedro Joaquin Coldwell establishing a working partnership to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and combat climate change.

Read full press release from the California Energy Commission

A Revolutionary Roadmap for California’s Distributed Energy Future

By Jeff St. John, Greentech Media

California is already changing its utility and energy regulations to incorporate rooftop solar, behind-the-meter energy storage, plug-in electric vehicles and other grid-edge resources, arguably faster than any other state. But a group of utilities and energy industry members have ideas for even more radical transformations ahead.

On Tuesday, the Advanced Energy Economy Institute released a report that calls for California regulators to consider entirely new ways for its major utilities to invest in and operate a distributed energy resource-rich grid, and how to get paid for it. The report, Toward a 21st Century Electricity System in California, lays out a laundry list of concepts that could help utilities shed their institutional need for investing in traditional generation and grid infrastructure, and encourage them to embrace customer-owned and third-party-controlled distributed energy resources (DERs) as an alternative.

The ideas aren’t that novel in and of themselves. What’s more noteworthy is the list of participants in the working group that created the document. That list includes California utilities Pacific Gas & Electric and Southern California Edison, as well as DER providers like SolarCity, Stem, SunPower, Enphase, EnerNOC, ChargePoint and SunEdison, which have at times sparred with the state’s utilities over how to balance utility and third-party interests when it comes to distributed energy.

Read full article from Greentech Media

Related article: Report—Incentives hold back clean energy (The San Diego Union Tribune)

Solar Star, Largest PV Power Plant in the World, Now Operational

By Eric Wesoff, Greentech Media

BHE Renewables’ 579 MW Solar Star project in Antelope Valley, Calif. went fully on-line on June 19th, allowing it to claim the title of the largest operational solar project on the planet. All three of the world’s largest photovoltaic solar plants are now located in California—Solar Star narrowly edges out the 550 MW Topaz Solar project in San Luis Obispo County and the 550 MW and the 550-megawatt Desert Sunlight project in Riverside for the title.

Construction started in January 2013 on the two Solar Star plants, which are sited in California’s Los Angeles and Kern counties and span more than 3,200 acres. The projects employ approximately 1.7 million SunPower monocrystalline silicon modules on single-axis trackers.

Although we may not see too many more solar projects of this size, the utility-scale solar business is alive and well. The utility segment installed 644 MW in Q1 2015, and there are 25 projects developers with pipelines of 100 MW or more, according to GTM Research’s U.S. Solar Market Insight report. GTM Research expects a flurry of activity in the utility segment over the next 18 months ahead of the scheduled decline of the federal Investment Tax Credit.

Read full article from Greentech Media